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Black treacle scones recipe

Black treacle scones recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Bread
  • Scones

This is a very old recipe. They may be a little heavy but you can lighten them up by using an egg in place of some of the milk if you like.

58 people made this

IngredientsServes: 15

  • 450g plain flour
  • 2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • 4 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 100g butter
  • 2 tablespoons treacle
  • 250ml milk

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:20min

  1. Preheat oven to 220 C / Gas 7. Lightly grease a baking tray.
  2. In a large bowl, sift together flour, bicarbonate of soda, cream of tarter, salt, cinnamon, allspice, cloves, nutmeg and ginger. Rub in butter with a fork or pastry blender. Combine milk and treacle in a small bowl; stir into flour mixture until moistened. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly. Roll dough out into a 1cm thick round. Cut out circles with a medium biscuit cutter and place pieces on prepared baking tray so that they are barely touching.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for 10 to 12 minutes. Move to a wire rack to cool slightly before serving. For soft scones, cover with a dry cloth for 10 minutes. For crisp scones, do not cover.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(27)

Reviews in English (23)

by J9STARTLET

the scones didn't have enough flavor - not enough molasses, not enough spice. they were also too dry as is; I added more milk... rather a disappointment....-26 Nov 2001

by CASSAROO

A great scone! I scaled the recipe down to eight (8) and it worked wonderfully. The molasses favor is very subtle and I would almost recommend adding more. Would this change the consistency? This is not a sweet scone, so those looking for more sweetness might want to jazz it up a bit. Overall, the scones are light and fluffy and would be delicious with any preserves. Apricot comes to mind immediately!-25 Apr 2003

by Cometgirl63

These scones are very good. I decreased the cinnamon to 1/4 teaspoon for my fiance and they are still very flavorful. Easy to make- I used my KitchenAid mixer with excellent results. A quick favorite!-27 Jan 2001


Black treacle scones recipe - Recipes

Traditional Scottish Recipes
- Treacle Scones

Treacle is known as molasses in some parts of the world and it features in a number of Scottish recipes.

Ingredients:
8 oz self-raising flour (all-purpose flour with baking powder in USA)
2 oz butter
1 oz caster sugar (fine granulated sugar)
Half a teaspoon of cinnamon
2 tablespoons black treacle (molasses) or golden syrup (light corn syrup)
Pinch of salt
Approximately quarter pint of milk

Method:
Sift the flour and salt into a bowl and rub in the butter. Mix in the sugar, cinnamon, treacle or syrup and enough milk to make a soft dough. Knead this on a floured surface until it is both moist and elastic. Cut into rounds with a 2.5 inch pastry cutter. Grease a baking sheet (cookie sheet) and place the rounds on this. Brush with a little milk and bake for 10/15 minutes in an oven, pre-heated to 425F/220C/Gas Mark 7 until golden brown. Allow to cool on a wire rack and serve split in half with butter.


Black Treacle Scones

This is a very old recipe. Serve these flavorful scones warm with butter. They may be a little heavy but you can lighten them up by using an egg in place of some of the milk if you like.

Original recipe makes 15 scones

Ingredients

3 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
4 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 cup butter
2 tablespoons molasses
1 cup milk

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Lightly grease a baking sheet.
  2. In a large bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, cream of tarter, salt, cinnamon, allspice, cloves, nutmeg and ginger. Cut in butter with a fork or pastry blender. Combine milk and molasses in a small bowl stir into flour mixture until moistened. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly. Roll dough out into a 1/2 inch thick round. Cut out circles with a medium biscuit cutter and place pieces on prepared baking sheet so that they are barely touching.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for 10 to 12 minutes. Move to a wire rack to cool slightly before serving. For soft scones, cover with a dry cloth for 10 minutes. For crisp scones, do not cover.

Nutrition

Calories: 185 kcal
Carbohydrates: 26.8 g
Cholesterol: 18 mg
Fat: 6.8 g
Fiber: 0.9 g
Protein: 3.8 g
Sodium: 298 mg


Best Traditional Treacle Scones

Treacle is a thick syrup made from refined sugar that is very similar to molasses. It comes in many varieties including pale, golden, and dark. The darker the treacle, the more robust the flavour profile is. It is very commonly used in British cuisine and desserts.

There are plenty of traditional Scottish recipes for treacle scones. They add such an amazing, sweet flavour, without having to deal with the sticky mess. Even though it is a sweetener, you won’t be using it to replace the sugar, but rather to add depth and richness.

If you grew up in Scotland, then treacle scones were probably a childhood favorite. This recipe should bring back those fond memories, as you bite into the sweet and fluffy scone and enjoy a nice cup of tea. There is truly nothing better. The best part is that these treacle scones would make the perfect dessert, or accompaniment to that first cup of tea or coffee in the morning.

The ingredients needed for this scone recipe are similar to a basic recipe, ensuring they are fairly easy to make.


Black Treacle Flapjack

My husband has a completely different taste in puddings and sweet food to me, so when he asked for me to make him some black treacle flapjack I was both interested and a little bit disgusted.

To me black treacle is one of them things I keep in the kitchen cupboard for the sole purpose of making my christmas cake it has always had that unappealing black, sticky look which really doesnt scream “eat me”. For him, he says that black treacle tastes nice. As flapjack is also one of his other favourite snacks it must have seemed a good idea to combine them.

So I went ahead and read a little bit more into black treacle flapjack and found out that it was originally created in the 1920’s by the women’s instititute, so is something of a classic recipe.

My recipe I created may not be 100% classic but is easy to make, requires little ingredients and gives you a nice chewy flapjack. I have to say that the flapjacks obviously do taste very strong of bitter black treacle, which gives it strange almost liquorice taste so isn’t recommended for someone with a sweet tooth. If you are like me and prefer your flapjack very sweet then substitute the treacle for golden syrup and it will still work perfectly.

250g cheap porridge oats
100g butter
40g light brown sugar
40g dark brown sugar
2 tbsp black treacle

1. In a large pan melt the butter, sugar and black treacle together.
2. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the porridge oats until all of the mixture has coated them.
5. Spread onto a small/medium baking try with sides and pat down until nice and squashed in. I think my flapjack were about 2″ thick.
6. Bake in the oven for 18 minutes.
7. Remove from the oven, and score with a palate knife. I cut mine into 8 generous peices.
8. Leave till completely cool before attempting to get it out of the tray.


1 ½ cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting

1 ½ cups coarse wholemeal flour

2 tablespoons sesame seeds, plus extra for sprinkling (optional)*

2 tablespoons butter, diced

1 ¼ cups buttermilk or soured milk (add 2 tsp vinegar or lemon juice to 1 ¼ cup cow’s milk or soy or rice milk and leave to stand for 10–15 minutes)

1 tablespoon black treacle (or dark molasses)

Sea salt and coarse sugar for sprinkling on top

*I didn’t have any sesame seeds but added a ½ teaspoon of cardamom, because I love it.


HOW TO MAKE TREACLE SCONES 1

Subscriber, Calo Mackinnon commented on my Golden Syrup Recipe that he loved Treacle scones, so after making my Homemade Dark Treacle I had to make them.

These are my Favourite Scones at the moment, they are just heavenly with that Dark Treacle Flavour running throughout.

Heaped with fresh cream and drizzled with more treacle they are perfect to give to someone you love this Valentines Day.

HOW TO MAKE TREACLE SCONES

How to make Treacle Scones
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1o-12 minutes
Oven Temperature: 200C / 400F
I Made 4 Heart Shaped Scones

Ingredients

200g / 7oz / 1 2/3rd cups of All Purpose Flour
2 teaspoons of Baking Powder
1/2 a teaspoon of Cinnamon
1/2 a teaspoon of Mixed Spice
2 tablespoons of Sugar
50g / 1/2 a stick of Softened Butter
1/4 of a cup of Dark Treacle
1/4 of a cup of Milk
Fresh Cream or Mascarpone and More treacle to serve


Ginger And Treacle Scone Recipe

Yesterday I had a craving for a cream tea. But as we are saving for a new bathroom (yawn) I decided I should make them myself.

A while ago we went to a lovely tea room in Dorset where I had some delicious treacle and ginger scones. As soon as I mentioned these, Kieron said he would help me make them so that was that decided.

There are a few recipes out there, but I adapted mine slightly from Cake, Crumbs and Cooking.

  • 225g self raising flour
  • 1/2tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp ground ginger
  • 50g butter (chopped into small cubes)
  • 100ml milk
  • 40g black treacle
  • 50g crystallised stem ginger pieces (chopped small)

  • Preheat the oven to 210C and line a baking sheet with baking paper.
  • Mix the flour, baking powder and ground ginger in a large bowl.
  • Add the cubed butt
    er and rub together with your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
  • Add the chopped crystallised ginger pieces and mix well.
  • Place the milk and treacle into a jug and warm in the microwave so the treacle distributes every through the milk.
  • Slowly add the milk and treacle and mix well until a dough forms.
  • Slightly flour your surface and tip the dough out of the bowl. Knead just long enough to bring the dough together.
  • Roll the dough to about 4cm thick
  • Cut out your scones using a round cutter. I went for small 5cm scones.
  • Lightly dust with flour (or brush with milk if you would prefer a glaze)
  • Bake for around 16 minutes (This was slightly too long for my small scones!)

Leave to cool before eating.

We enjoyed them with clotted cream and ginger preserve which was amazing.

Mine were a little burnt around the edges so I would probably reduce the baking time slightly next time, and I would also try to get more air into the dough as I didn’t get much rise. However, they tasted great which is the main thing!


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These are lovely, I had no buttermilk so added a little lemon juice to plain milk and baked as recommended but foir only 12 minutes which was ample.

Where's the treacle in this recipe? I have treacle in the cupboard, but the recipe says to use molasses. Can I just substitute?

When sugar is refined the liquid is squeezed from the sugar cane and is boiled in stages to remove the sugar crystals. The thick brown syrup leftover is molasses. The third and final stage of boiling leaves blackstrap molasses with the least amount of sugar, but the most nutrients. It has a tart-bitter flavor and is used commonly in animal feed.

To the cook who reviewed 12/12/2000: Blackstrap molasses has a VERY strong flavor. (It is the first batch of juice that comes from raw sugar cane - very unrefined.) If you use it in anything, your baked goods will have an overwhelming molasses flavor - don't use it.

Why not blacktrap molasses. Could someone let me know please.

How do you sift brown sugar. I added it to the other sifted ingredients. Microwave the molasses and butter. it is much simpler. Finally, 425* resulted in black scones. However, they did smell good enough to try again. I found 375* did the trick. VERY GOOD!


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