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How to Eat Like a Real New Yorker

How to Eat Like a Real New Yorker

Don’t want to stick out like sore thumb in New York? Follow these food cues to fit right in

Always fold your pizza in half. Never — and we mean never — take out a knife and fork to cut it up.

Always fold your pizza in half. Never — and we mean never — take out a knife and fork to cut it up.

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Take a photo of your food and post it to Instagram before (or as) you eat it, obviously.

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Live your life by New York’s Golden Rule: Delivery. Order in, order in, order in.

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Don’t even think about ordering that bagel toasted.

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Spend $5 on coffee, then $2 on a hotdog with everything on it, all in the same walk.

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Make dinner reservations for 10 p.m. on a Wednesday night because that’s totally normal. (No, this isn’t Spain, but this is the city that never sleeps.)

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Always have a to-go cup of coffee in your hand.

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Complain about people who wait in line for trendy food, then do it anyway “for the experience” while Instagramming about it.

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Have a go-to Halal guy.

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Faint whenever your cocktail comes out to under $12.

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Partake in the sacred ritual of brunch on weekends.

Photo Credit: imgur.com


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


How to Eat Dinner Like a Real New Yorker

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table&mdashthen bragging about it on social media&mdashis NYC&rsquos hot new dining trend." Oh, is it?

This article is from the archive of our partner .

According to the New York Post's Dana Schuster, "Waiting up to three hours for a table—then bragging about it on social media—is NYC’s hot new dining trend." Oh, is it? We like to be in on the trends we like to know things! So, how do you eat like a real New Yorker, partaking of all the latest habits and behaviors and even foibles of one? Here's what we learned from Schuster's handy guide.

Research first, possibly for months, to figure out where you want to go and how. Probably it will be: Pok Pok, Rosemary's, Brooklyn Crab, Mission Chinese Food, or Murray's Cheese Bar. Haven't heard of those places? Return to the non-New York place from whence you came, there's no room for you at those restaurants anyway.

In your research, which you should do mostly on the computer but also in person—stop by and lurk around the restaurant wearing dark glasses and a fedora while shooting with a telephoto lens for a day or two if you want to leave the amateur diners in the dust—you'll run into important information about how you'll have to wait for a table at the place of your choosing. You may, for instance, need to arrive 30 minutes before the place opens, sort of like you would to a Justin Bieber concert before the doors open. But since you don't want to stand around with a bunch of screaming teens, you should send your friend, "Chris," who lives in Lower Manhattan, because he'll do whatever you say and it's not like he has a real job that demands of him the way yours does, so he can get there at the ungodly hour of 5 p.m. or whatever. [Ed: All thoughts about "Chris" are completely fictionalized we don't even know this Chris person, and would never force him to wait in line for us]. Eventually join him with your boyfriend, a guy you know he is painfully jealous of, but come on, Chris, it's time to move on, it's never going to happen, just as he's texting that you better hurry up or you're never going to get a table:

“As we were walking there, Chris is like, ‘Please get here soon. There are seven people in front of me and 20 behind me!’ By 5:30, there were at least 70 people waiting behind,” says Wu, who lives in Gramercy.


Watch the video: The Best Burger In NYC. Best Of The Best (December 2021).